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After last week's Very Special Episode, we've grabbed a Hair of the Dog (or two...or three), a bit of rest, and we're back for a regular ol' episode of The Engadget Podcast. We're discussing a triplet of topics that are assuredly close to your heart and head: the experimental and bizarre phones from Amazon and Google, and the hit security flaw that all the kids are raving about (Heartbleed). The show starts at 12PM ET sharp(ish), so grab your favorite plate of leftovers, a set of cans and a comfy seat. And tune in!

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BRD RedShift MX hybrid motorcycle

The US' special forces units frequently can't rely on conventional ground transportation for their covert ops -- a loud engine is guaranteed to blow their cover. To tackle this problem, DARPA has just awarded Logos Technologies a contract to build a stealthy hybrid motorcycle for the military. The design modifies BRD's all-electric RedShift MX (pictured here) with a quiet hybrid power system that can run on multiple fuel types. The overhaul lets soldiers travel long distances while keeping a relatively low profile, and they can run solely on electric power for shorter periods if silence is absolutely vital. It's too soon to say when the bike will go into service or just how well it will perform, but it could be a lifesaver for troops that need both speed and secrecy.

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A terminally ill woman has reminded us of the limitless potential for devices like the Oculus Rift beyond just gaming and entertainment. After Roberta Firstenberg's cancer treatments failed last year, she was told she had just a few months to live. That prompted her game artist granddaughter Priscilla ("Pri") to send a moving note to the Oculus Rift support team, who quickly decided to send a dev unit. Using the 3D headset, Roberta was able to experience mobility again with the Tuscany Villa demo, complete with virtual trees, stairs and butterflies. She was even able to see her younger self and a beloved, deceased pet via a fortuitous Google Street View snap -- which inspired another idea.

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Samsung Milk Music on a Galaxy Note 3

You know what they say about all good things in life. Samsung has been offering an ad-free version of its Milk Music service for no charge since launch, but the company has posted a new infographic revealing that Americans will soon have to pay $4 per month for a Premium tier to escape marketers. You'll also get some "exclusive features" as a bonus, although it's not clear just what they'll entail. We've reached out to learn more about both the paid service launch and what those perks will be. For now, you'll want to cherish the current listening experience -- it may not be around for much longer.

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You might remember NASA's LADEE as the satellite where the administration tested a new broadband-fast laser communication system for sending data back to Earth. Now, however, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer is no more, since NASA just crashed the craft into the surface of the Moon. Unfortunately, the vehicle didn't have the power to maintain its orbit, so the bods in Florida decided to send the hardware on a one-way trip. On the upside, the satellite managed to grab some super-detailed scans of the lunar surface before burning up, and it probably looked really cool when it exploded, which probably justifies the wanton destruction of a multi-million dollar spacecraft.

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Matt's been steeped in old timey video over the past few days and it seems to have affected Dan's state of mind and podcast introduction. Once the anachronistic antics subside, the lads dig into the plausibility and potential for Google's Project Ara, a modular smartphone design that still has yet to prove its salt in the real world. On the mobile software side of things, BBC's iPlayer has finally embraced Android wholeheartedly and also wants to get viewers into a binging mood. Sky is also keen to get people consuming more content, but it's struggling with how to communicate its bundled packages to the masses. If you're looking for clarity of voice and intelligent banter, however, then you've probably come to the right place. Just pop on down to the streaming links below and you'll be whisked away into the wonderful world of the Engadget Eurocast. Enjoy!

Hosts: Dan Cooper, Matt Brian, Jamie Rigg

Producer: Jon Turi

Hear the Podcast:

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If a Windows Phone app disappoints you, it's probably right that you call out its failings and warn others to steer clear. Don't be surprised, however, if the minds behind the software start responding to your gripes directly. Microsoft is slowly rolling out a program whereby developers can comment on your reviews of their handiwork. Fortunately for you, however, the devs won't get access to your personal details, and, if they overstep the mark, you can report them for poor conduct. Still, the notion that coders will now get the chance to openly gain feedback from users seems like a step in the right direction -- just as long as everyone remains civil.

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When you have the cultural cachet of someone like the Wu-Tang Clan, there are a handful of luxuries afforded to you that few others have. Like selling the only copy of your upcoming album for $5 million, for instance. But in an effort to free Once Upon a Time in Shaolin's music to less-than-rich listeners, two fans have launched a Kickstarter in an attempt raise enough cash so everyone can hear the exclusive double album. The Staten Island rap group's original idea for the release was to sell it as an ultra-limited edition package after it completes a world-tour where fans could pay between $30 and $50 apiece to listen to it once, in a single sitting, in a museum.

Update: This Kickstarter bid -- ambitious as it may be -- likely violates the Kickstarter guidelines. We've reached out to Kickstarter for the official word.

Update 2: Of the potential violations we cited (from this page under "What is not allowed," the first, third and sixth), a Kickstarter rep says this project is in the clear.

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Although King's $7 billion empire is built on the slim foundation of its lone blockbuster, Candy Crush Saga, many thought its efforts to trademark "Saga" and "Candy" were a bit over-the-top. It now turns out the company isn't trying to crush every game maker that uses these words, and instead is taking each dispute on a case-by-case basis. To that end, it has cemented an out-of-court agreement to let the makers of Banner Saga and CandySwipe keep those monikers ("Candy" is only trademarked in Europe). Those two actually had legit challenges to the mark, but we imagine that other developers who deliberately used the terms to make a point (or for shits and giggles) may not get off so easily.

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Project Tango on a NASA SPHERE in zero gravity

Wonder what Google's Project Tango-equipped SPHERES robots will look like when they're in action aboard the International Space Station? The company is more than happy to show you. It has posted video of a recent test that took the machines on a zero gravity simulation flight to see how the 3D environment sensors and other systems will work in practice. As you'll see in the clip, it wasn't quite as easy as testing on the ground -- Google's ATAP team had to work during brief bursts of weightlessness that could challenge both the employees and the devices.

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