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Chrome for Android shows the weather in auto-complete suggestions

Google's as-you-type search suggestions have only offered the tiniest bit of help so far. They can handle basic math, but they won't answer questions that require more than a few numbers. However, that might soon change. Chrome for Android now has an experimental feature that answers some of your queries before you've even finished asking. Switch it on and you can get the weather, historic dates and other valuable info without ever seeing Google's usual results page. While the feature isn't all that vital when you have access to Google Now, it may save you the trouble of switching apps (or leaving the page you're on) when you just want to get a small factoid. There's also no hint as to when Google might make the feature standard on Android or bring it to the desktop, but let's hope that an upgrade comes soon -- it could save a lot of unnecessary keystrokes.

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It didn't get the best reception in theaters, but this year's new Godzilla flick is coming home this week on Blu-ray, along with a re-release of Ghostbusters 1 & 2. We're also getting our first taste of fall TV, as Fox lines up The Mindy Project and The New Girl (season three will be on Netflix if you haven't seen it) on Tuesday night. If you don't have Amazon Prime but want to watch Alpha House, the first season of that series is also on Blu-ray. Hit the gallery or just look after the break to check out each day's highlights, including trailers and let us know what you think (or what we missed).

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Real invisibility suits won't be as good as Harry Potter's

It's not as hard to make an invisibility cloak as you might think, but making one that's truly sophisticated is another matter; metamaterials (substances that change the behavior of light) are hard to build. Rice University appears to have solved part of the problem, however. It just developed a squid-like color display (shown below) that should eventually lead to smart camouflage. The new technology uses grids of nanoscopic aluminum rods to both create vivid, finely-tuned colors as well as polarize light. By its lonesome, the invention could lead to very sharp, long-lasting screens. The pixels are about 40 times smaller than those in LCDs, and they won't fade after sustained light exposure.

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Got a little too much money and an abundance of gaming gadgetry on your hands? Here's a weekend project that may be right up your alley. As demonstrated by KatsuKity, the makers of a 3DS capture card, you can rig up a way to play your favorite games on an Oculus Rift complete with those rad stereoscopic 3D effects (assuming the game in question actually has them). It's actually pretty simple once everything's hooked up -- KatsuKity's viewer software has been updated with support for the DK2, so once your tiny console is sending 3D video to your PC, you shouldn't have much trouble running that into your Rift. As for how you get that capture card up and running in the first place... well, that's another story entirely. You can either buy a a capture board and shoehorn it into your 3DS yourself, or take the easy way out and purchase a pre-modded unit. It's a pretty proposition either way, but it may just be a small price to pay to catch a few glimpses of Super Smash Brothers in three dimensions.

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Philae's landing site

You're not just looking at an unassuming piece of rock -- if anything, it's a piece of history. That's Site J, the European Space Agency's long-awaited choice of landing spot for Philae, the first probe built to reach a comet's surface. Scientists chose the seemingly uneventful location because it should offer the best chances of studying the comet's nucleus and other material without worrying about impurities. It should also guarantee that Philae both stays in touch with its Rosetta mothership and maintains just enough power to get its job done. You'll likely have to wait until touchdown on November 11th to get a closer look, but this at least serves as a good preview.

[Image credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA]

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Apple capped its iPhone 6 & Apple Watch launch event last week by announcing it would give away copies of a brand-new U2 album to all iTunes users -- but some people aren't happy about it. In apparently shocking news to the folks from Cupertino, not every single person in the world is a fan of the Irish rock band. Many were upset when the album suddenly appeared in their iTunes library, and, depending on a user's settings, sometimes downloaded itself onto mobile devices. There is a way to hide albums from view in iTunes, but if you just can't live with Songs of Innocence being tied to your account, Apple has pushed out a tool to eradicate it from your account forever. Go to this webpage, click remove album, enter your account info and poof -- it's gone, although you may still need to delete any downloaded copies. We hope next time Apple will ask before shoving a new LP into our libraries -- unless it's Detox.

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Protesters hold a rally before the FCC meeting on net neutrality proposal in Washington, DC.

It looks like a lot more of you have strong opinions on net neutrality than initially thought. The FCC has just announced that it's received more than 3 million comments on the topic, which blows away the previous estimate of 1.48 million and is more than twice that of the hubbub caused by Janet Jackson's "Nipplegate" back in 2004. Of course, seeing as net neutrality has gained quite a bit of coverage thanks to John Oliver and the recent "Day of Action" campaign, it's not exactly surprising that citizens everywhere are up in arms about the issue. If you want to chime in as well, you had better do so soon (either via this form or emailing openinternet@fcc.gov) -- comments on the topic end in just a few hours.

[Image credit: Washington Post/Getty Images]

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Folks looking for crowdfunding in Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Ireland just got a lucky break: Kickstarter is expanding its international reach. Starting today, creators in Ireland and Scandinavia will be able to submit projects to the crowdfunding site. An FAQ on the company's blog lays out the details: The new projects won't go live until October 21st, but they'll be visible to the worldwide Kickstarter community when they do. Like all international projects, pledge amounts will be listed in local currency -- kroners and euros, specifically. Scandinavian and Irish creators can check out the official announcement at the source link below.

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On October 13th, you'll have one less option for sending cash to individuals online. Amazon's WebPay, a feature of the company's broader Payments platform, will be shuttered. According to a FAQ posted on its site, the service is being closed down because it's "not addressing a customer pain point particularly better than anyone else." Users have until the 13th to initiate any transactions, then there will be a 30-day grace period in which customers can claim their funds before WebPay disappears completely. Axing the unpopular service will allow Amazon to use its resources elsewhere -- perhaps by turning Payments into a more full-fledged mobile wallet service à la Google Wallet or Apple Pay. Of course, there are no shortage of options out there if you want to send money to friends and family electronically. Apparently there's a company called PayPal, or something, that's been doing it for a long time.

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We've seen MIT's super-fast four-legged Cheetah bot sprint on a treadmill many times, but it seems that the team at MIT is finally ready to let the thing outside. Now, quadrupedal bots traversing hill and dale are nothing new, but the Cheetah's doing so using a new algorithm and without the benefit of an internal combustion engine or hydraulics. That algorithm determines the amount of force the bot's custom high-torque electrical motors deliver, which in turn controls how fast the robot runs and how high it leaps. Using this force-based approach, the Cheetah is more stable and agile, according to the boffins at MIT, and it can maintain its balance as the speed of its gait increases. Not to mention that the electric motors are quiet, so instead of an exhaust note, you only hear the pitter-patter of robot feet. This all adds up to a robot that can silently bound across uneven ground and even jump over obstacles. It's not as fast as its furry namesake... yet, but you can hear from its creators and see its bounding baby steps in the video after the break.

[Image Credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT]

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